July 2005 Yoga Teacher Training Newsletter

Home/Newsletter Parent/July 2005 Yoga Teacher Training Newsletter
July 2005 Yoga Teacher Training Newsletter 2017-04-26T15:29:53+00:00

Yoga Teacher Training Question of the Month

Q: I am just starting to practice on a regular basis with almost six months experience. I am starting to visibly see, and feel, the benefits of Yoga. Can you recommend a resource for people who are brand new students and want to make a lifestyle change? I eventually would like to participate in one of your home study yoga teacher training courses in the future.

A: There are a number of good books, and quality videos, to develop a solid foundation. The first book I would personally recommend is, The Heart of Yoga , Developing a Personal Practice by T.K.V. Desikachar, who trained many of today’s modern masters, this one book will help anyone develop their own routine.

This is also a good reference book for anyone at any level of practice.

There are also many good quality magazines, such as Yoga International and Yoga Journal.

Yoga Teacher Training: Multiple Sclerosis and Yoga

By Sanjeev Patel

Yoga instructor training for working with students who have Multiple Sclerosis is quite specialized. In fact, the training is much like Yoga therapy. Yoga instructor Eric Small, diagnosed with MS at the age of 22, credits Yogic exercise for his good health in spite of the disease. In addition to writing and producing videos about Yogic methodology for the past four decades, Small has also developed special programs for people with physical handicaps.

In one study, researchers at the Oregon Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Neurological Disorders randomly assigned 69 people with multiple sclerosis to one of three groups: a weekly Iyengar class accompanied by practice at home, a weekly exercise class on a stationary bike with additional home practice, or a group on a waiting list for one of these two classes.

After six months, there was no evidence to support mood or cognitive function, but the group who participated in Yoga training had more energy and less fatigue. Researchers did not investigate the effect of Yogic exercise on the course of the illness.

With the help of B.K.S. Iyengar, Small adapted poses to meet the needs of people suffering from MS. He recommends that the postures be done at each person’s individual pace and held for 10 to 20 long breaths before releasing and moving into the next posture.

Asanas Recommended for MS

1. Basic breathing with a rolled towel to support the back

2. Downward-Facing-Dog supported by chair with feet against the wall or on blocks

3. Wheelchair Version with hands against the wall and blocks under feet

4. Seated Forward Bend done on two chairs

5. Wheelchair Version with safety belt and chair for support

6. Cobbler Pose with two chairs

7. Warrior Pose with two chairs for support

8. More Mobile Warrior Pose with only one chair

9. Triangle Pose while balancing against the wall

10. Spinal Twist while sitting in chair

11. Backbend on chair with sticky mat for support in chair seat

12. Backbend Wheelchair Variation

13. Legs up the Wall Pose with blankets or bolsters for support

Although these asanas are recommended for MS, many are also appropriate for other limitations. Benefits are the same as those normally associated with the poses.

© Copyright – Aura Wellness Center – Publications Division

Announcement: Holistic Weight Control Course

We will be releasing a new eBook that will have a holistic view of health, diet, and exercise in August. It will combine principles for an easy to follow method of spiritual, mental, and physical health. We will also have a continuing education course, CEC, based upon the book. To see more about this course, please feel free to visit the following page.

https://www.aurawellnesscenter.com/store/Complete-Holistic-Weight-Control-E-Course-with-Diploma.html